Gallery Programs

Upcoming Programs


3 in 30: Digital Thinking in Art

Tue, May 3, 11–11:30 am & Thu, May 5, 6:30–7 pm | Visitor Services

Digital thinking is both a response to and a result of a wide range of media that has erupted over the past century. Led by Dr. Meghan Rosatelli, Digital Learning Coordinator, this gallery talk will explore a diverse trio of works that attempts to answer a pressing question: how do we respond to the collapse of time and space in popular culture?

Free, no tickets required

 


3 in 30:André Kertész

Tue, Jun 7, 11–11:30 am & Thu, Jun 9, 6:30–7 pm | Visitor Services
With Frank Saunders, Administrative Assistant for the Studio School and Photography Collection Educator

Hungarian born photographer André Kertész was a renowned flaneur, an idle but observant man of the street. His street photographs, interiors and portraits are poetic and timeless, making him arguably one of the greatest photographers of everyday life. This 3 in 30 will explore the visual language that makes his images so universally appealing.

Free, no tickets required


3 in 30: Trappings of British Sporting Art

Tue, Jul 5, 11–11:30 am & Thu, Jul 7, 6:30–7 pm | Visitor Services

What could contemporary artist Kehinde Wiley have in common with a 19th-century painter of American thoroughbred horses? Join Jeffrey Allison, VMFA’s Paul Mellon Collection Educator, to explore three works in the Paul Mellon Collection of British Sporting Art and discover the connections between the work of artist Edwin Troye and Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic.

Free, no tickets required


3 in 30: Cultural Crosscurrents in South Asian Portraiture

Tue, Aug 2, 11–11:30 am & Thu, Aug 4, 6:30–7 pm | Visitor Services

Inspired by the painting The White Slave featured in the exhibition Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic, curator John Henry Rice will lead a gallery talk focusing on painted portraits in the museum’s South Asian collection. Such portraiture became widespread during the reign of the Mughals and was itself largely a product of foreign artistic ideas. From the time of the tradition’s inception, its creators engaged and grappled with multiple modes of representation—Indian, Persian, and European. Cultural collisions, fusions, and tensions around the differing visual languages of power only escalated through the colonial period.

Free, no tickets required